VenueTourist

“The purpose of VenueTourist’s Capstone Project was to determine the best market niche for virtual tours and how to best sell to that niche. In order to determine the best market niche, we explored three separate industries: universities, corporations, and venue owners. The evaluation of ‘best market’ was based on ease of sale and willingness to pay. After conducting sales efforts – email outreach, meetings, and if we were successful, contract signature – in each niche, it was determined the university market was both easiest to sell to and had the highest willingness to pay. The second question, what is the best way to sell to universities, was evaluated by seeking advice from mentors in our industry and then testing said advice.

Advice from mentors for sales strategies included cold emailing, cold calls, campus ambassador programs, traveling to university dense areas, going to conferences, and more. Initial results showed campus ambassadors and traveling to university dense areas as the best sales methods in order to maximize potential revenue (probability of closing sale * price of potential sale). From these results, VenueTourist has concluded the best path for growth is to create a small team of skilled sales ambassadors and have them travel to university dense cities in order to sell our virtual tours.”

Check out their Capstone poster here!: Venue Tourist Capstone Poster

Team members:

Connor Tullis, BBA, 2020
Sven Wollschlaeger, BBA & CS, 2021

UpNext

“The problem that we are solving is people’s inability to have a say in the music playing around them in a party and other social settings. Currently, everyone in the party is at the mercy of the party host, or the owner of the phone attached to the speakers. Many times, peoples’ unique song tastes cause them to argue about which songs to play, causing people in the party not to have a good time. Our solution is to make it as seamless as possible for everyone in the party to have a say in the music playing. Based on our analysis of the current ecosystem involving music streaming services, businesses and college students, we created UpNext, a live collaborative playlist iOS application. Using UpNext, anyone can add any songs they want and vote on songs; songs with higher vote scores will be played earlier. In attempt to establish product-market fit, we had been constantly gathering data through our user’s use cases through Firebase Analytics, as well as personal interviews and surveys with our users. Our Student Ambassadors had also been spreading UpNext to new users and gaining feedback from these users. In addition, using UpNext in bars in Ann Arbor had also been a good source of data and research into the features needed by bars. The result shows that UpNext solves a problem faced by many college students. UpNext has amassed over 1000 users in Ann Arbor with 150 weekly active users. In addition, 2 bars in Ann Arbor use UpNext as their source of music daily.”

Check out their Capstone poster here!:

Up Next Capstone Poster

Team members:

Raymond Sukanto, Business & Computer Science 2020
Daniel Kaper, Computer Science, 2020
Victor Mahdavi, Business, 2020
Matthew Samaan, Organizational Studies, 2020

The dot org

“We are The Dot Org, an organization dedicated to reducing the stigma surrounding menstruation and providing greater access to menstrual hygiene products. We are passionate about our project, because as women who experience menstruation, we have seen the effects it can have on social and mental health. Through summer research, we also understand the effects menstruation has on those who experience homelessness. We began our project by collecting data about the multiple target populations within the geographical community with which we wished to study. We successfully conducted a focus group, interviews, a survey, and a literary review on the range of how menstruation can negatively affect the lives of those in Ann Arbor, as well as how the stigma surrounding menstruation originated. We learned that providing greater accessibility to menstrual products would improve the lives of members in our community, and decided to increase accessibility to free menstrual products in local businesses, schools, and homeless shelters. We partnered with businesses such as BlueLep, Study Hall Lounge, and SavCo, and collected data on products we provided them to show them that the products were worth providing if they were affordable to the business. After collecting data for Blue Lep and Study Lounge we found that tampons are used more frequently than pads and people really appreciated having the products there, even if they did not need them. We also worked with Hill House, Pease House, and MISSION to collect data on menstruators experiencing poverty and homelessness, and learned about their preferences and menstrual experiences. To reduce the stigma surrounding menstruation, we hosted two awareness events and hosted member meetings to talk about how the stigma can affect people’s lives. We also put free products in the Campus Library restroom with facts about menstruation attached.

In the end we found that people do want products in the bathrooms even if they themselves do not need it every time they are there. They like the message that is being sent and would like to see it more places. The economic impact on the companies implementing the distribution is low and would take very little effort to continue after the pilot and the benefits outweigh the costs.”

Check out their Capstone poster here!: the dot org poster

Team members:

Gabby Morin, Sociology of Health and Medicine, Pre-dental, 2020

Nina Serr, Biology Health & Society, Entrepreneurship, 2020
Justine Burt, Business Administration, 2021
Mallory Demeter, Business Administration, 2021

NavNextSteps

“The purpose of our project was that validate the pains of high school students when applying to college, and then develop a solution. The team hosted focus groups, completed market research (benchmarking), and conducted interviews to draft a business proposal. We identified understanding the “standards” of the application process and stress as the main pain points of our customers and have developed a prototype that we hope to continue testing. We have completed proofing our survey and algorithms and have drastically simplified the original sequences after receiving customer feedback. Moving forward, we are looking to test our prototype in actual schools.”

Check out their Capstone poster here!: Nav Next Steps Poster

Team members:

Grace Wang, BBA, 2021
Jessica Vinagolu-Brar, Pyschology 2021

Migrant Education Initiative (MEI)

“The Migrant Education Initiative (MEI) is working with the Van Buren Intermediate School District (VBISD) to create an initiative aiming to bring more students of Migrant backgrounds to the University of Michigan. The VBISD is located in Van Buren county, an area with one of the highest Migrant populations in the state of Michigan- it’s the largest migrant-serving program in the state. This past summer, we conducted four focus groups, and surveyed over 60 parents and students to gather their opinions and perceptions of higher education. Even though most of these parents did not attend college, both them and their children were eager to achieve at least a bachelor degree. With a lack of representation of both migrant and Latinx student populations at the University of Michigan, MEI will assist in bringing these hopeful students to our four-year university. With our recent partnership with VBISD, we hope to bring this group of students to the University of Michigan over the summer, and launch an application incentive program to get these students the best chance of achieving their goal as possible.”

Check out their Capstone poster here!: MEI Capstone Poster

Team members:

Victoria Villegas, BA Sociology ‘20

Amanda Gomez, BS Information ‘19

The Right to Success Program

The Right To Success program took place on MLK Day (1/21). Our program focused on bringing marginalized students from the Grand Rapids area to the University of Michigan for a college visit. Our goal was to inspire and motivate students to pursue higher education and look into applying to U of M.

Students received informationals from the office of admissions and the office of financial aid and were able to see firsthand how attainable being accepted and paying for college can be. This was the first college visit many students had attended and we received very positive feedback from the participants and their chaperones. We look forward to hearing back from students in the coming months as they apply to colleges!

By: Alfredo Delarosa

Food for Thought: Snacks for Leadership Lab!

Hey guys!

My name is Justine Burt, and I am a Peer Facilitator from the 1st semester of the 2018/2019 school year.
I wanted to thank the BLI for offering funding to our project so that we could afford to get food for the lab. It really made a difference to the students and added a burst of energy when you got a snack during class. I talked to many of the students, and they said they always looked forward to seeing what the snack of the day was. They also liked trying new things and having snacks that they had not had since they were kids. We tried to keep the food choices fun and comforting while also throwing in some new things that people had probably never had. Thanks again for this opportunity and I hope we will be able to use grants for BLI lab food again!

By Justine Burt

 

A Holiday Helping Hand! Care Packages for the Homeless.

As part of the BLI leadership lab, our group made care packages for the homeless!

These care packages not only included items like socks and gloves that are extremely needed this time of year a local shelters, but we also added a personal and festive component to each care package. We created holiday notes and added candy canes to the packages as a way of creating more depth to our donations.

We hope that this will help those in need this holiday season! Here are pictures of the packages during when we were putting them together! We were able to have other UM students help us and talk to them about our project, our impact and the things we’ve learned while at the BLI which was extremely fulfilling and fun!

By: Jianella Macalino

Next Generation Ovarian Cancer Alliance – Ovary Fun Night

Next Gen is a student organization on UofM’s campus. Our mission statement is through campus involvement, Next Gen will work to raise awareness and educate people on the University of Michigan’s campus about ovarian cancer. This year we hosted our second annual Ovary Fun Night. This is an awareness gala we host each year. During the event, we teach people about ovarian cancer, have ovarian cancer survivors tell their stories, we have the GMen perform, and we have auction off items. This is a time for people to come together and learn about such an important cause. This year we were able to earn more money as well as reach more people than last year, which is our number one goal.

This year we faced less challenges than last year. It was nice to have to a foundation from last year to grow and improve from. The only challenge I can think of that we faced is before the event we did not have as many people signed up as we had hoped. However, we reached out the day of the event and told them it was not too late to register. This doubled our attendance. It taught us never to give up on recruiting people. It also showed us that our crowd might be more last minute people so we should continue to remind them of the event and tell them to come in the future.

We are very grateful to the Barger Leadership Institute and for the help they gave us. We plan to continue working hard to spread awareness about ovarian cancer throughout our time at the University and will pass the organization on to others when we leave. This event allowed us to spread awareness, which is a critical part of our mission. We are excited to see what the future holds and are hoping to partner with the BLI again.

By: Barbara Dahlmann

Our Global Africa: A Night of Food, Music, and Performances

Our Global Africa: A Night of Food, Music, and Performances November 16, 2018 7-9pm, UMMA Apse

A Collaboration between UMMA, African Students Association (ASA), Caribbean Student Association (CSA), Black Student Union (BSU), and Creatives of Color (CoC)

In conjunction with UMMA and the breaktaking exhibit, ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa,’ ASA, CSA, BSU, and CoC shared their perspectives on how African culture, artistic expressions, and traditions are beyond borders. The exhibition explores identity, migration, and the international scope of art from Africa and the African Diaspora.

Co-host Jeremy Kwame

The event was an outstanding success! There were approximately 200 people in attendance to mingle and visit the exhibition before the performances, witness amazing performances, and enjoy delicious catering. The food must have been good because we ran out pretty quickly! Further, this event had a more diverse turnout in terms of racial and ethnic social identities than some of our previous events, which was exciting.

Pictured right: Jeremy Kwame, one of our co-hosts, introducing the next performance. Attendees viewed performances on the main floor of the Apse, as well as from the balcony.

We would like to recognize all the performers for the event:

Lindsey Sharpe: Cello

Aldo Leopoldo Pando Girard: Spoken word

Ambiance Dance Team

Dania Harris: Spoken word

AMALA Dancers

Zoe Allen: Spoken word

Kameron Johnson, Caelin Amin, Tariq Gardner, Kasan Belgrave: Band

Our team started small by meeting with Dr. Laura DeBecker, the Associate Curator of African Art at UMMA and Ms. Lisa Borgsdorf, the Manager of Public Programs at UMMA, in April of this year. They were hoping to collaborate with ASA on an interactive event surrounding the ‘Beyond Borders: Global Africa’ exhibition. From there, ASA members reached out to other student organizations part of the African Diaspora for performances to create an engaging, and educational evening of African artistic expressions. Once performances were finalized, we delegated speaking roles to our co-hosts, point person on ASA, and collaborators at UMMA. This skill of starting small contributed to a successful evening because everyone knew what their responsibilities were.

Pictured left: AMALA Dancers before their performance. The Amala Dancers’ mission is to promote self-love, pride, and unity to descendants of Africa and its Diaspora and to the greater campus community. ‘Amala’ is an Igbo word that means grace, as in grace of God. Amala also comes from the name of a dance “egwu-amala” that was popular among those that lived by the river. “Egwu-amala” can be translated as the “canoe dance” or the “mermaid-dance”.

We also utilized the BLI Habit, work to learn, during the planning process. For example, we learned that an effective way of gauging the educational impact of our event is by waiting for opportunities to present themselves. The gallery viewing, for some attendees, sparked a deeper interest in the inspiration surrounding the exhibition. A team member had the exciting opportunity to witness an attendee ask Dr. DeBecker about what led her to that position and which artist’s work in the gallery was her favorite. This interaction is an example of how running the event led to learning something that could not have been planned. Also, Creatives of Color, Caribbean Student Association, Black Student Union, and African Students Association have not collaborated on a event before, but after working together, conversations have already taken place for future collaborations.

Although the event was a success, there were some challenges along the way. During the planning process, sometimes the groupchat among the collaborating organizations was stagnant. We dealt with this challenge by personally reaching out to representatives from the other organizations, rather than asking for updates in the groupchat. This change in communication was more successful because the representatives were more responsive, and ASA members were able to start associating names with faces. During the event, one challenge was not having enough time for all performers to do a sound check. We dealt with this challenge by performing the sound check for as many performers as we could, and welcoming and encouraging the guests who arrived early to move to the cocktail tables for food and mingling.

Overall, we are very happy with the outcome of the event. It was a new event, with a substantial number of guests. We could not have done it without the tremendous amount of support from UMMA.

Pictured left: Ms. Lisa Borgsdorf, Manager of Public Programs at UMMA and Tosin Adeyemi, ASA’s point person for the event (and Kehinde Wiley in the flesh!)

Further, I’d encourage anyone interested in African Art to take HISTART 208, taught by Dr. Ray Silverman and Dr. Laura DeBecker. It was an amazing class that ended up leading to this entire event!

Unfortunately, the exhibit is no longer displayed, but more information can be found at the following link: https://umma.umich.edu/exhibitions/2018/beyond-borders-global-africa

 

Thank you again BLI for your support. We hope to collaborate again in the near future.

Sincerely,

ASA Executive Board 2018-2019

Pictured (left to right):

Kingsley Enechukwu, Ihunanya Muruako, Megan Manu, Giselle Uwera, Temitope Oyelade, Tosin Adeyemi, & Maxwell Otiato

Not pictured: Jeremy Kwame Selina Asamoah

 

 

By: Tosin Adeyemi, Treasurer, African Students Association

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